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20121008
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
forward to 1982. george h.w. bush was on the ropes over bill clinton when casper weinberger was imply indicated in the iran/contra scandal shortly before election day. bad news for bush that he did not need. in 2004 a classic october surprise. osama bin laden released a video on october 29th just four days before election day in a raz orthin race between president bush and john kerry. three years after 9/11 it served as a reminder of the terrorist threat and strategists in both parties believed helped president bush. more recently the term october surprise has come to mean a seismic event in the fall of an election year though most have centered around foreign policy others have been about the economy like in 2008. when the economy imploded, john mccain's advisers say his campaign collapsed along with it and never recovered. historians say in order for an october surprise to have a real 11th hour impact it has to feed into a narrative that already exist, whether it's carter's ineffectiveness or questions about mccain's credentials on the economy. >> it's not so much that suddenly eure
go back to when george w. bush was president of the united states and when gas was, what, 3 bucks a gallon, something like that? it was gigantic letters on the headline, the paper of the "new york times" where they were hammering it. now we've got a president where the gas has doubled. i think it was 1.85 when he took office. now close to 4 bucks. >> i think that we have seen, steve, an amazing propensity of the media to kind of put a very positive spin on some pretty not so impresssive economic news. >> steve: what is that? >> because maybe i think a number of us have been stunned by the extent to which this time at least headline writers seem to lean towards democrats. if you have headline about slow growth, you would expect to see that in the headline. but instead, you see a headline in the times or the journal about a stock surge instead. they did a study at -- aei did a study that showed 15% of the headline which is tended to be more positive given grim economic news and when you're talking about democrats. >> steve: the word is not getting out. >> they're cheerleading they'r
in the second debate, they could get on a roll in the same way george w. bush did against al gore in 2000. >> governor romney seemed to be pro-regulation. he said he was against cutting taxes for the wealthy in this debate. some see this as a bit of a transformation, a move to the middle a month before the election. is that what's happening here and might it benefit him going forward? >> well, i think it will benefit him, lester. i don't think it's a move toward policy. it is in tone. a lot of people have wondered why mitt romney have not projected that tone earlier. what he was trying to say to americans is i share the values behind the impulse to regulate, to expand health care, to expand education, but i want to do it in a different way and here's why my way is better. that's an effective style of argumentation. that's what he showed. it's going to be up to the president if he can rebut it to do so in the next debate. he didn't do it in the first debate. >> we've got a couple more ahead. john harwood, thanks very much. >> you bet. >> let's get a check of this morning's other headlines.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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